Calories in Marketside Vegetable tray

How many calories should you eat?

Nutrition Facts Marketside Vegetable tray

Amount Per 0.5 cup vegetables 2 tbsp dip
Calories 110 Kcal (461 kJ)
Calories from fat 72 Kcal
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8g 12%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Cholesterol 10mg 3%
Sodium 220mg 9%
Total Carbs 8g 3%
Sugars 4g 16%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Protein 2g 4%
Vitamin C 30mg 50%
Vitamin A 18mg 600%
Iron 0.7mg 4%
Calcium 40mg 4%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Find out how many calories should you eat.

Ingredients And Nutrition Overview

  • WeightWatchers Points: 2.5, PointsPlus: 3, SmartPoints: 4
    WeightWatchers Points are estimated by carbohydrates, fats, protein and fiber in product. They are not an affirmation of better quality or nutritional value of the product or its manufacturer. Only way to count for dieters. Less points are better.
    Read more at Weight watchers diet review
  • For dieters: FoodPoints value is 3
    * FoodPoints are calculated by Fooducate based on fats, carbs, fiber, and protein. They are not an endorsement or approval of the product or its manufacturer. The fewer points - the better.
  • Sugar/sweetener has been added
    We're already consuming too much sugar in our diet. No need to add it everywhere.
  • Highly Processed!
    This product is highly processed. If you'll take a look at its ingredient list, you'll discover new words to add to your vocabulary. Many of theses ingredients are required to increase the shelf life of the product and improve the flavor that disappears when food is not fresh.
  • Contains MSG-like ingredients
    People sensitive to MSG may also be sensitive to MSG-like substances. These are glutamates or chemically similar items added to improve a product's taste. Here is a short list of common MSG-like substances (see our blog for more): - Yeast extract - Autolyzed yeast - Hydrolyzed proteins ---- Source: Scopp AL. MSG and hydrolyzed vegetable protein induced headache: review and case studies. Headache. 1991;31(2):107-10. Questions and Answers on Monosodium glutamate (MSG) Natural Flavorings on Meat and Poultry Labels
  • Naturally high in Vitamin C
    The vitamin C in this product comes from real food, not as a fortified ingredient. This is important because it means you are getting hundreds of additional nutrients from the real food.
  • Naturally high in Vitamin A
    The vitamin A in this product comes from real food, not as a fortified ingredient. This is important because it means you are getting hundreds of additional nutrients from the real food.
  • A top product in its category
    This product is in the top 10% of the products in its category
  • Frozen veggies - healthier than fresh?
    Generally speaking, frozen veggies have the same amount of nutrients as fresh veggies, and sometimes they have even MORE. This is because frozen veggies are picked at their peak. They are then immediately blanched and frozen. Thus most of their vitamins and minerals are well preserved. In contrast, fresh veggies may have already been sitting on the supermarket shelf for a while before going onto your plate. They also may not have been picked when ripe. In any case: fresh or frozen, eat veggies to your heart's content. They are filled with vitamins, minerals and nutrients. Any veggie that makes it onto your plate is a good veggie!
  • Natural flavors added. Learn why
    Companies add flavorings to make products taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Natural flavorings are more expensive to source than artificial flavors, but tend to be better received by consumers. People sensitive to MSG, vegans, vegetarians and those with allergies should pay special attention to the phrase "natural flavorings" since glutamates, animal products or allergens may be the source of natural flavors. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Learn about corn syrup, found here
    Corn syrup is often used as a sweetener in processed food. It is NOT THE SAME as high fructose corn syrup. Don't be fooled when looking up the amount of sugar a product contains if corn syrup is listed as an ingredient. This is because corn syrup contains 50% sugar, and 50% of another form of carbohydrate known as ""oligosaccharides"", which is pretty close to sugar. If a product has less sugar than you think it should, but contains corn syrup in the ingredient list, you'll know that the missing carbs are those oligosaccharides, not much better.
  • Learn about Xanthan Gum, found here
    Xanthan gum is an emulsifier. It helps ingredients blend more effectively and stay blended while waiting on a shelf. For example – water and oil mixtures, as well as bits of spice in a salad dressing. Xanthan Gum is made by fermenting corn sugar with a bacteria, Xanthomonas campestris. It’s the same bacteria that creates black spots on broccoli and cauliflower. The result is a slimy goo that is then dried up and ground into a fine white powder.
  • Low sodium veggies? Yes you can!
    Are you on a low sodium diet or just avoiding sodium? Here are some tips for low-sodium veggies. - Buy fresh or frozen veggies. - If buying canned veggies - rinse them to get some salt off. - Avoid pre-sauced frozen vegetables - Season with salt-free herbs and spices - Try a dash of hot sauce instead of salt - When eating out, pass on sodium-heavy veggie dishes like green bean casserole, collard greens with ham, or creamed corn - Watch out for veggies + dip. Sometimes the dip is heavily salted
  • Learn about Maltodextrin, found here
    Maltodextrin is a polysaccharide that is used as a food additive. A polysaccharide is a type of carbohydrate. It is produced from starches of corn, wheat, potatoes or rice. Its flavor can be slightly sweet or almost flavorless. Maltodextrin is used as a bulking base for artificial sweeteners, for example in Jell-o it is used in conjunction with Aspartame and Acesulfame Potassium. It is also the bulking agent in Splenda.

How to burn 110 calories

Let's Burn 110 Calories!

% RDI of Main Nutrition Facts

of RDI* (110 calories) 113 g
  • Cal: 5.5 %
  • Fat: 12.3 %
  • Carb: 2.7 %
  • Prot: 4 %
  • 0%
    RDI norm*

Calories Breakdown

  • Carbs (28.6%)
  • Fat (64.3%)
  • Protein (7.1%)
Marketside Vegetable tray Good and Bad Points
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