Calories in Sapporo Ichiban Noodle soup oriental, original flavor

How many calories should you eat?

Nutrition Facts Sapporo Ichiban Noodle soup oriental, original flavor

Amount Per 2.25 oz, 64 g
Calories 300 Kcal (1256 kJ)
Calories from fat 117 Kcal
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 13g 20%
Saturated Fat 7g 35%
Sodium 1340mg 56%
Total Carbs 39g 13%
Sugars 2g 8%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Protein 5g 10%
Vitamin A 0.1mg 4%
Iron 2.3mg 13%
Calcium 20mg 2%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Find out how many calories should you eat.

Ingredients And Nutrition Overview

  • WeightWatchers Points: 6.3, PointsPlus: 8, SmartPoints: 11
    WeightWatchers Points are estimated by carbohydrates, fats, protein and fiber in product. They are not an affirmation of better quality or nutritional value of the product or its manufacturer. Only way to count for dieters. Less points are better.
    Read more at Weight watchers diet review
  • Over 35% of daily saturated fat!
    Bad! More 35% of daily saturated fat!

    For years Saturated fat was claimed to raise cholesterol levels and give us heart attacks. Today different studies refute this claim. They say, that replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates or refined starch or sugar is not changing the heart disease risk. Not processed carbs nor saturated fats are good for you. Only if you replace it with polyunsaturated fat, you'll get a reduction in heart disease risk. So try to have a balanced diet.
  • Oh dear! Very salty! Over 50% of daily sodium allowance
    The average American consumes 5,000 mg of sodium daily — twice the recommended amount amount of 2400mg for healthy adults, this is 1 teaspoon of salt.
    For medical reasons many people should not exceed 1500mg of sodium.
    Surprisingly, you're responsible for only 15% of the sodium in your diet the bigger part - 75% of the sodium that you consume each day comes from processed foods, not home cooking or the salt shaker.
    Excess sodium intake increases the risk of high blood pressure, hypernatremia, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and other heart problems.
    Are these reasons enough to cut the sodium intake? No doubt!
  • Convert Salt tsps to Sodium mg easily
    Salt (NaCl) is not excactly sodium (Na).
    It is not right to use these terms as synonyms.
    The FDA recommended limit of sodium is 2,300 mg per day (or even less - about 1500 mg while one is on low sodium diets).
    This is much less than the weight of salt.
    (5,750 mg per day or 3,750 mg for low sodium diet) and not so convenient to calculate.
    Know how much sodium is in your salt - without a calculator:
    1/4 tsp salt = 600 mg sodium
    1/2 tsp salt = 1200 mg sodium
    3/4 tsp salt = 1800 mg sodium
    1 tsp salt = 2300 mg sodium
  • Great! Contains less than 1.5 tsp of sugar.
    Great! Contains less than 1.5 tsp of sugar per serving!
  • High in fiber! Great More than 20% of daily needs!
    Eat more fiber. You've heard it many times. But why it is so good for your health?
    Dietary fiber is best known for its ability to make our digestion going right.
    So want to prevent or relieve constipation - eat more fiber!
    There are also other great health benefits as well, such as lowering your risk of diabetes, heart disease and cancer, and helping to maintain a healthy weight by helping to feel you full longer.
    The best source of fiber are fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes and not processed foods with added fiber.
  • A good source of protein
    For many vegans and vegetarians, it's important to get enough protein.
    The product you've just scanned will provide you with 10% or more of your daily protein requirement.
    If you're a vegan having trouble meeting your protein needs, try nuts and beans.
    Sprinkling nuts onto any dish is a quick, easy and nutritious solution.
    Try adding beans in places you might not normally eat them.
    Add beans to pasta dishes, stir fries and even salads.
    While meat alternatives like Tofu do provide a quick and easy protein intake, they should not be your only source of protein.
    Eat proteins from a variety of sources for best results.
  • Contains MSG!
    Monosodium Glutamate is used as a flavor enhancer with an umami taste that intensifies the meaty, savory flavor of food.
    Naturally occurring glutamate does it in foods such as stews and meat soups.

    Despite the fact that MSG is one of the most extensively studied food ingredients and is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by FDA.
    Some people should steer away from it as they feel that react adversely to MSG.

    MSG is generally found in processed, low-quality foods, stuff that you shouldn’t be eating much.

    REMEMBER: Any food ingredient listed as hydrolyzed, protein-fortified, ultra-pasteurized, fermented or enzyme-modified is often MSG, or creates free glutamic acid during processing.
  • Contains trans-fats! Even if label says 0!
    Consumption of food containing trans-fat has unequivocally been shown to increase the risk of heart disease by raising levels of LDL (bad cholesterol), and lowering levels of HDL (good cholesterol). Why do the nutrition labels on some products say that there are no trans fats, while Fooducate insists there are? Unfortunately there is an FDA loop hole here. If the amount of trans-fat in a product is less than half a gram per serving, manufacturers can round it down to 0. But even 0.49 grams of trans-fat is bad for you. And don't even get us started on the actual consumption versus the tiny serving size. So how do you know if a product does have trans fat in it? Look for "partially hydrogenated" oils and fats in the ingredient list. Sources: ----------- Mensink RPM, Katan MB. Effect of dietary trans fatty acids on high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in healthy subjects. N Engl J Med 1990;323:439-45. Zock PL, Katan MB. Hydrogenation alternatives: effects of trans fatty acids and stearic acid versus linoleic acid on serum lipids and lipoproteins in humans. J Lipid Res l992;33:399-4l0. Judd JT, Clevidence BA, Muesing RA, Wittes J, Sunkin ME, Podczasy JJ. Dietary trans fatty acids: effects of plasma lipids and lipoproteins of healthy men and women. Am J Clin Nutr 1994;59:861-8. Lichtenstein AH, Ausman LM, Jalbert SM, Schaefer EJ. Effects of different forms of dietary hydrogenated fats on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels. N Engl J Med 1999;340:1933–1940 Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, Rimm E, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, et al. Dietary fat intake and the risk of coronary heart disease in women. N Engl J Med. 1997;337:1491–9. Mozaffarian D, Katan MB, Ascherio A, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC. Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. N Engl J Med. 2006;354:1601–1613.
  • Contains MSG!
    Monosodium Glutamate is responsible for the umami (savory) flavor of foods, but some people steer away from it as it causes them adverse reactions.
  • For dieters: FoodPoints value is 8
    * FoodPoints are calculated by Fooducate based on fats, carbs, fiber, and protein. They are not an endorsement or approval of the product or its manufacturer. The fewer points - the better.
  • Highly Processed!
    This product is highly processed. If you'll take a look at its ingredient list, you'll discover new words to add to your vocabulary. Many of theses ingredients are required to increase the shelf life of the product and improve the flavor that disappears when food is not fresh.
  • Contains MSG-like ingredients
    People sensitive to MSG may also be sensitive to MSG-like substances. These are glutamates or chemically similar items added to improve a product's taste. Here is a short list of common MSG-like substances (see our blog for more): - Yeast extract - Autolyzed yeast - Hydrolyzed proteins ---- Source: Scopp AL. MSG and hydrolyzed vegetable protein induced headache: review and case studies. Headache. 1991;31(2):107-10. Questions and Answers on Monosodium glutamate (MSG) Natural Flavorings on Meat and Poultry Labels
  • Learn about industrial caramel coloring
    Homemade caramel is made by melting sugar in a saucepan. Brown coloring in sodas and some other products is not the same thing. Industrial caramel coloring is made by reacting sugars with ammonia and sulfites under high pressure and temperatures. The chemical reactions create 4-methylimidazole, which in government-conducted studies caused lung, liver, or thyroid cancer or leukemia in laboratory mice or rats. This is why California recently required foods containing caramel color to be labeled as potential cancer-causing agents. But you won't see this warning label any time soon - manufacturers simply reduced the use of caramel color enough that the labeling requirements no longer applied. Caramel color varies slightly between products - when in beer, sauces or baked goods it has just ammonia and when used in soft drinks, it has both sulfites and ammonia. Neither one is a "good" option. Bottom line: Choose something else, less controversial.
  • One of the worst products in its category
    This product is in the bottom 10% of the products in its category
  • Contains artificial flavors. Learn why
    Companies add artificial flavors to products to make them taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Artificial flavorings are cheaper to source than natural flavors and are perceived as "worse" than natural flavors. They are more stable (and usually less chemically complex) than natural flavors. Artificial flavors are not necessarily bad for you from a health perspective. however, people with food sensitivities or allergies may want to avoid artificial flavors if they are unnamed. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Learn about disodium guanylate
    Disodium guanylate imparts the umami flavor to foods such as soups and savory snacks. This allows the reduction of the sodium content. This "food enhancer" may be problematic for babies, asthmatics, people who suffer from gout or uric acid kidney stones. In most cases it is derived from vegetable sources. But sometimes it may come from fish, so vegetarians or vegans, ask the manufacturer to be certain.
  • Learn about Maltodextrin, found here
    Maltodextrin is a polysaccharide that is used as a food additive. A polysaccharide is a type of carbohydrate. It is produced from starches of corn, wheat, potatoes or rice. Its flavor can be slightly sweet or almost flavorless. Maltodextrin is used as a bulking base for artificial sweeteners, for example in Jell-o it is used in conjunction with Aspartame and Acesulfame Potassium. It is also the bulking agent in Splenda.
  • Learn about disodium inosinate
    Disodium inosinate provides an umami flavor to foods. It is often found together with MSG. It can be sourced from vegetables, fungi, or animal sources.


Gluten Allergy, Wheat Allergy, Soy Allergy, Corn Allergy, Sulfites Allergy, Sesame Allergy

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Noodle soup oriental, original flavor Ingredients

Oriental Noodles: Enriched Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Palm Oil (TBHQ and Citric Acid Added to Protect Flavor), Potato Starch, Soy Sauce (Water, Wheat, Soybeans, Salt, Sodium Benzoate-Preservative), Salt, Alginic Acid, Sodium Carbonate, Turmeric, Tocopherols and Potassium Carbonate, Soup Base: Salt, Monosodium Glutamate, Sugar, Maltodextrin, Soy Sauce Powder (Soy Sauce (Wheat, Soybeans, Salt], Maltodextrin, Salt), Spices, Onion Powder, Caramel Color (Contains Sulfites), Beef Stock Powder, Disodium Succinate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Garlic Powder, Corn Oil, Chicken Broth Powder (Maltodextrin, Chicken Broth Flavor [Contains Chicken Broth, Salt, Flavor]), Disodium Inosinate, Disodium Guanylate and Sesame Seed Oil Dehydrated Vegetables: Corn, Carrots and Leek Chips.

% RDI of Main Nutrition Facts

of RDI* (300 calories) 64 g
  • Cal: 15 %
  • Fat: 20 %
  • Carb: 13 %
  • Prot: 10 %
  • 0%
    RDI norm*

Calories Breakdown

  • Carbs (53.2%)
  • Fat (39.9%)
  • Protein (6.8%)
Sapporo Ichiban Noodle soup oriental, original flavor Good and Bad Points
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