Calories in Southern Belle Lobster cake

How many calories should you eat?

Nutrition Facts Southern Belle Lobster cake

Amount Per 1 serving
Calories 100 Kcal (419 kJ)
Calories from fat 45 Kcal
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 5g 8%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Cholesterol 35mg 12%
Sodium 330mg 14%
Total Carbs 9g 3%
Sugars 2g 8%
Protein 3g 6%
Vitamin C 3mg 5%
Vitamin A 0.1mg 2%
Iron 0.3mg 2%
Calcium 20mg 2%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Find out how many calories should you eat.

Ingredients And Nutrition Overview

  • WeightWatchers Points: 2.4, PointsPlus: 3, SmartPoints: 3
    WeightWatchers Points are estimated by carbohydrates, fats, protein and fiber in product. They are not an affirmation of better quality or nutritional value of the product or its manufacturer. Only way to count for dieters. Less points are better.
    Read more at Weight watchers diet review
  • For dieters: FoodPoints value is 3
    * FoodPoints are calculated by Fooducate based on fats, carbs, fiber, and protein. They are not an endorsement or approval of the product or its manufacturer. The fewer points - the better.
  • Highly Processed!
    This product is highly processed. If you'll take a look at its ingredient list, you'll discover new words to add to your vocabulary. Many of theses ingredients are required to increase the shelf life of the product and improve the flavor that disappears when food is not fresh.
  • Includes bug powder. Check out carmine
    Carmine is a red food coloring made of ground up powdered Cochineal insects. Originating in Aztec Mexico, the females set up shop on cactii, where they breed and eat. The male lives for just one short week to reproduce and then dies. The Aztecs would collect the bugs, briefly boil them in water, dry the bodies in the sun and then pulverize them into a fine scarlet powder known as cochineal or carmine. The powder dye was used for royal garments and was later coveted by the Spanish conquistadors who brought it back to Europe. Food manufacturers began using it about 100 years ago to add luster to products such as pork sausages, dried shrimp, candies, jams, and maraschino cherries. Manufacturers prefer not to disclose their use of carmine and instead added "artificial color" to their ingredient list. Starting January 1, 2011, FDA mandates them to clearly identify the colorings as carmine or cochineal extract on food labels to help consumers identity the cause of their allergic reaction and avoid the colorings in the future.
  • Contains glycerides
    Mono and diglycerides are commonly used in processed foods to maintain stability in liquid products and "improve" quality in baked goods. These glycerides could be created using both hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils or animal fats. In theory, this may transfer a small amount of trans fats into the product. The glycerides are synthesized into phosphates by reacting with phosphorus pentoxide, a potential environmental hazard. But that's only part of the problem . . . The presence of mono and diglycerides should discourage you from buying a product for more than just these reasons: their inclusion in a product indicates that it is industrially processed. Choose products without mono and diglycerides not only for health reasons, but because you are getting a better quality food item overall.
  • Natural flavors added. Learn why
    Companies add flavorings to make products taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Natural flavorings are more expensive to source than artificial flavors, but tend to be better received by consumers. People sensitive to MSG, vegans, vegetarians and those with allergies should pay special attention to the phrase "natural flavorings" since glutamates, animal products or allergens may be the source of natural flavors. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Learn about Xanthan Gum, found here
    Xanthan gum is an emulsifier. It helps ingredients blend more effectively and stay blended while waiting on a shelf. For example – water and oil mixtures, as well as bits of spice in a salad dressing. Xanthan Gum is made by fermenting corn sugar with a bacteria, Xanthomonas campestris. It’s the same bacteria that creates black spots on broccoli and cauliflower. The result is a slimy goo that is then dried up and ground into a fine white powder.

How to burn 100 calories

Let's Burn 100 Calories!

% RDI of Main Nutrition Facts

of RDI* (100 calories) 43 g
  • Cal: 5 %
  • Fat: 7.7 %
  • Carb: 3 %
  • Prot: 6 %
  • 0%
    RDI norm*

Calories Breakdown

  • Carbs (38.7%)
  • Fat (48.4%)
  • Protein (12.9%)
Southern Belle Lobster cake Good and Bad Points
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