Calories in Sour Patch Xploderz

How many calories should you eat?

Nutrition Facts Sour Patch Xploderz

Amount Per 41 g
Calories 140 Kcal (586 kJ)
Calories from fat 0 Kcal
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Sodium 20mg 1%
Total Carbs 33g 11%
Sugars 21g 84%
Protein 2g 4%
Calcium 20mg 2%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Find out how many calories should you eat.

Ingredients And Nutrition Overview

  • WeightWatchers Points: 3, PointsPlus: 4, SmartPoints: 6
    WeightWatchers Points are estimated by carbohydrates, fats, protein and fiber in product. They are not an affirmation of better quality or nutritional value of the product or its manufacturer. Only way to count for dieters. Less points are better.
    Read more at Weight watchers diet review
  • Convert Salt tsps to Sodium mg easily
    Salt (NaCl) is not excactly sodium (Na).
    It is not right to use these terms as synonyms.
    The FDA recommended limit of sodium is 2,300 mg per day (or even less - about 1500 mg while one is on low sodium diets).
    This is much less than the weight of salt.
    (5,750 mg per day or 3,750 mg for low sodium diet) and not so convenient to calculate.
    Know how much sodium is in your salt - without a calculator:
    1/4 tsp salt = 600 mg sodium
    1/2 tsp salt = 1200 mg sodium
    3/4 tsp salt = 1800 mg sodium
    1 tsp salt = 2300 mg sodium
  • 8 tsp of sugars per serving
    This volume includes both naturally occurring from ingredients and specially added sugars.
    USDA tells us that last years each American consumed an average 130 pounds of caloric sweeteners per year!
    That works out to 30 tsp of sugars per day approximately 480 extra calories!
    Just to think: Eating just 200 more calories daily than your body requires for body functioning and exercise leads to a 20-pound weight gain in a year.
  • Contains controversial artificial colors
    Once upon a time, there were no food colorings. Then folks figured out that food looks better and sells more when it can be enlivened through dyes. For most of food history, the dyes were from natural sources – beet juice for red, turmeric for yellow,etc… However, in the quest to increase color intensity and lower manufacturing costs, cheap artificial dyes were introduced to market. Unfortunately they pose a risk for hyperactivity in children, cancer, and allergic reactions. ----------- Sources: Feingold BF. Hyperkinesis and learning disabilities linked to artificial food flavors and colors. Am J Nurs 1975; 75-5: 797-803. Harley JP, Matthews CG, Eichman P. Synthetic Food Colors and Hyperactivity in Children: A double-blind challenge experiment. Pediatrics 1978; 62: 975-983. Kobylewski S, Jacobson M. Toxicology of food dyes. Int J Occup Env Heal 2012; 18-3: 220-246. McCann D, Barrett A, Cooper A, Crumpler D, Dalen L, Grimshaw K, Kitchin E, Lok K, Porteous L, Prince E, Sonuga-Garke E, OWarner J, Stevenson J. Food additives and hyperactive behavior in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2007; 370: 1560-67. Schab DW, Trinh NT. Do artificial food colors promote hyperactivity in children with hyperactive syndromes? A meta-analysis of double-blind placebo-controlled trials. J Dev Behav Pediatr 2004; 25: 423-434. Sonuga-Barke EJS, Hollis C, Brandeis D, Konofal E, Cortese S, Lecendreux M, Daley D, Wong I, Ferrin M, Sergeant J, Holtmann M, Stevenson J, Danckaerts M, Van Der Oord S, Dopfner M, Dittmann R, Simonoff E, Zuddas A, Banaschewski T, Buitelaar J, Coghill D. Nonharmacological interventions for ADHA: Systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials of dietary and psychological treatments. Am J Psychiatry 2013; 170-3: 275-289. Stevens LJ, Kuczek T, Burgess JR, Hurt E, Arnold LE. Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: Thirty-five years of research. Clin Pediatr 2011; 50:279-293. Williams JI, Cram DM, Tausig FT, Webster E. Relative effects of drugs and diet on hyperactive behaviors: An experimental study. Pediatrics 1978; 61-6: 811-817.
  • For dieters: FoodPoints value is 4
    * FoodPoints are calculated by Fooducate based on fats, carbs, fiber, and protein. They are not an endorsement or approval of the product or its manufacturer. The fewer points - the better.
  • Highly Processed!
    This product is highly processed. If you'll take a look at its ingredient list, you'll discover new words to add to your vocabulary. Many of theses ingredients are required to increase the shelf life of the product and improve the flavor that disappears when food is not fresh.
  • Contains artificial flavors. Learn why
    Companies add artificial flavors to products to make them taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Artificial flavorings are cheaper to source than natural flavors and are perceived as "worse" than natural flavors. They are more stable (and usually less chemically complex) than natural flavors. Artificial flavors are not necessarily bad for you from a health perspective. however, people with food sensitivities or allergies may want to avoid artificial flavors if they are unnamed. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Natural flavors added. Learn why
    Companies add flavorings to make products taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Natural flavorings are more expensive to source than artificial flavors, but tend to be better received by consumers. People sensitive to MSG, vegans, vegetarians and those with allergies should pay special attention to the phrase "natural flavorings" since glutamates, animal products or allergens may be the source of natural flavors. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Read more about gelatin
    Horns and hooves? Not quite. The urban legend that gelatin comes from horns & hooves is not true. But don't make a sigh of relief just yet . . . Gelatin is made from animal skins and bones - often as by-products of the meat and leather industries. If you're avoiding animal products, you probably want to avoid gelatin that is not clearly marked as vegan. Kosher or halal gelatin often comes from fish.


Corn Allergy, Gluten Allergy

How to burn 140 calories

Let's Burn 140 Calories!

Xploderz Ingredients

Corn Syrup, Sugar, Gelatin, Modified Starch (Corn and Potato), Citric Acid, Lactic Acid, Malic Acid, Pectin, Tartaric Acid, Natural & Artificial Flavors, Titanium Dioxide (Color), Red 40, Blue 1 and Yellow 5.

% RDI of Main Nutrition Facts

of RDI* (140 calories) 41 g
  • Cal: 7 %
  • Fat: 0 %
  • Carb: 11 %
  • Prot: 4 %
  • 0%
    RDI norm*

Calories Breakdown

  • Carbs (94.3%)
  • Protein (5.7%)
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