Calories in Bon Appetit Muffin strawberry cheese

How many calories should you eat?

Nutrition Facts Bon Appetit Muffin strawberry cheese

Amount Per 0.333 muffin, 52 g
Calories 200 Kcal (837 kJ)
Calories from fat 99 Kcal
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 11g 17%
Saturated Fat 3g 15%
Cholesterol 35mg 12%
Sodium 125mg 5%
Total Carbs 23g 8%
Sugars 13g 52%
Protein 3g 6%
Iron 0.6mg 3%
Calcium 60mg 6%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Find out how many calories should you eat.

Ingredients And Nutrition Overview

  • WeightWatchers Points: 4.9, PointsPlus: 6, SmartPoints: 8
    WeightWatchers Points are estimated by carbohydrates, fats, protein and fiber in product. They are not an affirmation of better quality or nutritional value of the product or its manufacturer. Only way to count for dieters. Less points are better.
    Read more at Weight watchers diet review
  • Much saturated fat
    Too much saturated fat raises blood cholesterol, that can increase the risk of heart disease.
    This fact has been approved by most health organizations in the world.
    You have to limit the intake of it by your recommended daily intake.
    Ideally, we should eat less than 10% of calories from saturated fat, so the reference value for an average adult is 24 grams daily.
    Remember: a 1-ounce slice of regular cheese has nearly 5 grams of saturated fat.
    Read more about fat
  • Keep an eye on the cholesterol.
    Today cholesterol is no longer a villain. The 2010's USDA guidelines told us to limit cholesterol from foods
    Now experts say cholesterol is "not a nutrient of concern" because cholesterol from foods doesn't cause higher blood cholesterol levels.
    Nevertheless try to consume no more than 300 milligrams daily.

    This product contains more than 12% of your daily cholesterol intake.

    If you still are on a low cholesterol diet, please keep in mind:
    • nutritionists are not recommending you go out and binge on cheeseburgers and fries.
    • 10% of your daily allowance can quickly become 50% when a hamburger turns into double cheeseburger.

      Want to lower the cholesterol intake? Here are some advices:
    • Try to limit your cheese, dairy and meat intake to one item per meal.
    • Avoid meals with multiple sources of cholesterol (chicken with cheese, junk food)
    • Try to indclude in your diet low- or nonfat dairy, seafood, legumes and nuts.
    • Choose water instead of milk for your coffee.
  • Convert Salt tsps to Sodium mg easily
    Salt (NaCl) is not excactly sodium (Na).
    It is not right to use these terms as synonyms.
    The FDA recommended limit of sodium is 2,300 mg per day (or even less - about 1500 mg while one is on low sodium diets).
    This is much less than the weight of salt.
    (5,750 mg per day or 3,750 mg for low sodium diet) and not so convenient to calculate.
    Know how much sodium is in your salt - without a calculator:
    1/4 tsp salt = 600 mg sodium
    1/2 tsp salt = 1200 mg sodium
    3/4 tsp salt = 1800 mg sodium
    1 tsp salt = 2300 mg sodium
  • 5 tsp of sugars per serving
    This volume includes both naturally occurring from ingredients and specially added sugars.
    USDA tells us that last years each American consumed an average 130 pounds of caloric sweeteners per year!
    That works out to 30 tsp of sugars per day approximately 480 extra calories!
    Just to think: Eating just 200 more calories daily than your body requires for body functioning and exercise leads to a 20-pound weight gain in a year.
  • Not a really good source of calcium!
    Cheese is a generally a good source of calcium (more than 10% daily value per serving) - but not this.
    If you are looking for calcium - swap for something with higher calcium content.
    By the way, you don't need high fat or calories to get high calcium.
    Many "lite" versions of cheese provide 30% of daily calcium needs.
    Choose cheeses that are a naturally good source of calcium.
    If you're worried about fat and calories, pre-sliced cheese, cheese sticks or cheese squares
    are a great way to make sure your portion is the right size.
    The FDA defines a serving of cheese as 1 ounce (30 grams).
  • Contains controversial artificial colors
    Once upon a time, there were no food colorings. Then folks figured out that food looks better and sells more when it can be enlivened through dyes. For most of food history, the dyes were from natural sources – beet juice for red, turmeric for yellow,etc… However, in the quest to increase color intensity and lower manufacturing costs, cheap artificial dyes were introduced to market. Unfortunately they pose a risk for hyperactivity in children, cancer, and allergic reactions. ----------- Sources: Feingold BF. Hyperkinesis and learning disabilities linked to artificial food flavors and colors. Am J Nurs 1975; 75-5: 797-803. Harley JP, Matthews CG, Eichman P. Synthetic Food Colors and Hyperactivity in Children: A double-blind challenge experiment. Pediatrics 1978; 62: 975-983. Kobylewski S, Jacobson M. Toxicology of food dyes. Int J Occup Env Heal 2012; 18-3: 220-246. McCann D, Barrett A, Cooper A, Crumpler D, Dalen L, Grimshaw K, Kitchin E, Lok K, Porteous L, Prince E, Sonuga-Garke E, OWarner J, Stevenson J. Food additives and hyperactive behavior in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2007; 370: 1560-67. Schab DW, Trinh NT. Do artificial food colors promote hyperactivity in children with hyperactive syndromes? A meta-analysis of double-blind placebo-controlled trials. J Dev Behav Pediatr 2004; 25: 423-434. Sonuga-Barke EJS, Hollis C, Brandeis D, Konofal E, Cortese S, Lecendreux M, Daley D, Wong I, Ferrin M, Sergeant J, Holtmann M, Stevenson J, Danckaerts M, Van Der Oord S, Dopfner M, Dittmann R, Simonoff E, Zuddas A, Banaschewski T, Buitelaar J, Coghill D. Nonharmacological interventions for ADHA: Systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials of dietary and psychological treatments. Am J Psychiatry 2013; 170-3: 275-289. Stevens LJ, Kuczek T, Burgess JR, Hurt E, Arnold LE. Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: Thirty-five years of research. Clin Pediatr 2011; 50:279-293. Williams JI, Cram DM, Tausig FT, Webster E. Relative effects of drugs and diet on hyperactive behaviors: An experimental study. Pediatrics 1978; 61-6: 811-817.
  • For dieters: FoodPoints value is 6
    * FoodPoints are calculated by Fooducate based on fats, carbs, fiber, and protein. They are not an endorsement or approval of the product or its manufacturer. The fewer points - the better.
  • Highly Processed!
    This product is highly processed. If you'll take a look at its ingredient list, you'll discover new words to add to your vocabulary. Many of theses ingredients are required to increase the shelf life of the product and improve the flavor that disappears when food is not fresh.
  • Contains glycerides
    Mono and diglycerides are commonly used in processed foods to maintain stability in liquid products and "improve" quality in baked goods. These glycerides could be created using both hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils or animal fats. In theory, this may transfer a small amount of trans fats into the product. The glycerides are synthesized into phosphates by reacting with phosphorus pentoxide, a potential environmental hazard. But that's only part of the problem . . . The presence of mono and diglycerides should discourage you from buying a product for more than just these reasons: their inclusion in a product indicates that it is industrially processed. Choose products without mono and diglycerides not only for health reasons, but because you are getting a better quality food item overall.
  • Is propylene glycol anti-freeze?
    Propylene glycol is a food and drink additive that is used as a thickener, clarifier, stabilizer and as a carrier for color and flavor. But wait, isn't propylene glycol anti-freeze, the chemical used in your car's engine coolant?! It is the same chemical, yet the FDA categorizes propylene glycol as generally recognized as safe (GRAS), meaning it can be added to foods, drugs and cosmetics. The World Health Organization also considers propylene glycol safe, in certain dosages: up to 25 mg of propylene glycol for every kilogram (kg) of body weight. However, the EU does not treat propylene glycol as a safe food additive. In fact, it is not permitted as a food additive in most European countries due to recent studies in animals. In pets, propylene glycol has been show to: - cause "Heinz Body Anemia" (small clumps of proteins seen in the cells) - reduce the survival time of red blood cell and render them susceptible to oxidative damage (leading to cancer) - potentially cause GI problems, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea! Our recommendation: try and choose products without propylene glycol in the ingredient list.
  • Contains artificial flavors. Learn why
    Companies add artificial flavors to products to make them taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Artificial flavorings are cheaper to source than natural flavors and are perceived as "worse" than natural flavors. They are more stable (and usually less chemically complex) than natural flavors. Artificial flavors are not necessarily bad for you from a health perspective. however, people with food sensitivities or allergies may want to avoid artificial flavors if they are unnamed. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Natural flavors added. Learn why
    Companies add flavorings to make products taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Natural flavorings are more expensive to source than artificial flavors, but tend to be better received by consumers. People sensitive to MSG, vegans, vegetarians and those with allergies should pay special attention to the phrase "natural flavorings" since glutamates, animal products or allergens may be the source of natural flavors. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Learn about Maltodextrin, found here
    Maltodextrin is a polysaccharide that is used as a food additive. A polysaccharide is a type of carbohydrate. It is produced from starches of corn, wheat, potatoes or rice. Its flavor can be slightly sweet or almost flavorless. Maltodextrin is used as a bulking base for artificial sweeteners, for example in Jell-o it is used in conjunction with Aspartame and Acesulfame Potassium. It is also the bulking agent in Splenda.
  • Learn about soy lecithin, found here
    Lecithins are oily substances that occur naturally in plants (soybeans) and animals (egg yolks). Soy lecithin possesses emulsification properties. This means it can keep a candy bar “together” by making sure that the cocoa and the cocoa butter don’t separate. It is also used in bakery items to keep the dough from sticking and to improve its ability to rise.
  • Learn about Xanthan Gum, found here
    Xanthan gum is an emulsifier. It helps ingredients blend more effectively and stay blended while waiting on a shelf. For example – water and oil mixtures, as well as bits of spice in a salad dressing. Xanthan Gum is made by fermenting corn sugar with a bacteria, Xanthomonas campestris. It’s the same bacteria that creates black spots on broccoli and cauliflower. The result is a slimy goo that is then dried up and ground into a fine white powder.
  • What is Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate?
    Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate is a chemical similar to lactic acid used in the processing of food. The FDA and consumer organizations have found it safe. We don't think it's dangerous, however, it is an indicator that the product is processed. We like that it's biodegradable, but still . . . it provides no nutritional value and few consumer benefits. When buying food, keep in mind that the presence of Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate means that this item is processed. It makes bread look big and fluffy, icing look light and pillowy, and reduces the amount of fat and sugar needed in baked goods. Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate makes processed food cheaper, more beautiful and gives it a more appealing texture. We recommend avoiding it if because we like food to be processed as little as possible . . .


Gluten Allergy, Wheat Allergy, Eggs Allergy, Soy Allergy, Lactose Allergy, Milk Allergy, Corn Allergy

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Muffin strawberry cheese Ingredients

Bleached Wheat Flour Enriched (Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Malted Barley Flour, Ascorbic Acid, Folic Acid), Granulated Sugar, Eggs, Soybean Oil, Palm Oil (with Mono & Diglycerides, Polysorbate 60, Citric Acid Added as a Preservative), Invert Sugar, Modified Food Sugar, Baking Powder, Potassium Sorbate & Sodium Propionate (Added to Preservative Freshness), Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate, Glucono-1, 5, Lactone, Xanthan Gum, Guar Gum, Lipolyzed Cream, Malto Dextrin, Cream Cheese (Heavy Cream, Natural Flavors, Nonfat Dry Milk, Enzymes, Dairy Cultures, Propylene Glycol, Cheddar Cheese [Pasteurized Milk, Cultures, Salt and Enzymes], Water, Anhydrous Milkfat, Salt, Disodium Phosphate, Trisodium Citrate, Soy Lecithin), Natural and Artificial Flavors, Red 3, Red 40.

% RDI of Main Nutrition Facts

of RDI* (200 calories) 52 g
  • Cal: 10 %
  • Fat: 16.9 %
  • Carb: 7.7 %
  • Prot: 6 %
  • 0%
    RDI norm*

Calories Breakdown

  • Carbs (45.3%)
  • Fat (48.8%)
  • Protein (5.9%)
Bon Appetit Muffin strawberry cheese Good and Bad Points
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