Calories in Yankee Trader Seafood New england cod fish cakes

How many calories should you eat?

Nutrition Facts Yankee Trader Seafood New england cod fish cakes

Amount Per 1 cake, 85 g
Calories 70 Kcal (293 kJ)
Calories from fat 9 Kcal
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1g 2%
Saturated Fat 0.4g 2%
Cholesterol 25mg 8%
Sodium 280mg 12%
Total Carbs 9g 3%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Protein 5g 10%
Vitamin C 3mg 5%
Iron 0.3mg 2%
Calcium 20mg 2%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Find out how many calories should you eat.

Ingredients And Nutrition Overview

  • WeightWatchers Points: 1.3, PointsPlus: 2, SmartPoints: 2
    WeightWatchers Points are estimated by carbohydrates, fats, protein and fiber in product. They are not an affirmation of better quality or nutritional value of the product or its manufacturer. Only way to count for dieters. Less points are better.
    Read more at Weight watchers diet review
  • Salty! Has over 12% of the daily sodium max
    The average American consumes 5,000 mg of sodium daily — twice the recommended amount amount of 2400mg for healthy adults, this is 1 teaspoon of salt.
    For medical reasons many people should not exceed 1500mg of sodium.
    Surprisingly, you're responsible for only 15% of the sodium in your diet the bigger part - 75% of the sodium that you consume each day comes from processed foods, not home cooking or the salt shaker.
    Excess sodium intake increases the risk of high blood pressure, hypernatremia, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and other heart problems.
    Are these reasons enough to cut the sodium intake? No doubt!
  • Convert Salt tsps to Sodium mg easily
    Salt (NaCl) is not excactly sodium (Na).
    It is not right to use these terms as synonyms.
    The FDA recommended limit of sodium is 2,300 mg per day (or even less - about 1500 mg while one is on low sodium diets).
    This is much less than the weight of salt.
    (5,750 mg per day or 3,750 mg for low sodium diet) and not so convenient to calculate.
    Know how much sodium is in your salt - without a calculator:
    1/4 tsp salt = 600 mg sodium
    1/2 tsp salt = 1200 mg sodium
    3/4 tsp salt = 1800 mg sodium
    1 tsp salt = 2300 mg sodium
  • A good source of protein
    For many vegans and vegetarians, it's important to get enough protein.
    The product you've just scanned will provide you with 10% or more of your daily protein requirement.
    If you're a vegan having trouble meeting your protein needs, try nuts and beans.
    Sprinkling nuts onto any dish is a quick, easy and nutritious solution.
    Try adding beans in places you might not normally eat them.
    Add beans to pasta dishes, stir fries and even salads.
    While meat alternatives like Tofu do provide a quick and easy protein intake, they should not be your only source of protein.
    Eat proteins from a variety of sources for best results.
  • Learn about veggies and iron
    Veggies such as broccoli, bok choy, spinach, parsley and most leafy greens are naturally high in iron.
    However, compared to other high-iron foods, like red meat, fish and poultry, the iron in plant foods is not absorbed as easily by the body. What can you do to increase the absorption of iron from these plant foods?
    • Vitamin C increases the absorption - so try having a fresh tomato, lemon juice, or an orange together with your high iron food
    • Avoid drinking too much coffee - caffeine can decrease the absorption of iron
    • In addition to caffeine, the tannins found in tea can also reduce iron absorption
    • If you are a vegetarian, try having iron-fortified breakfast cereals, legumes, and eggs
    • For dieters: FoodPoints value is 2
      * FoodPoints are calculated by Fooducate based on fats, carbs, fiber, and protein. They are not an endorsement or approval of the product or its manufacturer. The fewer points - the better.
    • Highly Processed!
      This product is highly processed. If you'll take a look at its ingredient list, you'll discover new words to add to your vocabulary. Many of theses ingredients are required to increase the shelf life of the product and improve the flavor that disappears when food is not fresh.
    • Contains azodicarbonamide. Learn more
      Azodicarbonamide is a popular dough conditioner. It also bleaches the flour (makes it whiter). It's considered safe in the US at up to 45 parts per million, but is banned from use in Europe because studies showed it could cause asthma or allergic reactions. ---- Sources: Kim C, Cho J, Leem J, Ryu J, Lee H, Hong Y. Occupational asthma due to azodicarbonamide. Yonsei Med J. 2004; 45-2: 325-329. Normand JC, Grange F, Hernandez C, Ganay A, Davezies P, Bergeret A, Prost G. Occupational asthma after exposure to azodicarbonamide: Report of four cases. Brit J Ind Med. 1989; 46: 60-62. Vlastos D, Moshou H, Epeoglou K. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of semicarbazide on cultured human lymphocytes and rat bone marrow. Food Chem Toxicol. 2010; 48: 209-214. Ye J, Wang X, Sang Y, Liu Q. Assessment of the determination of azodicarbonamide and its decomposition product semicarbazide: Investigation of variation in flour and flour products. J Agr Food Chem. 2011; 59: 9313-9318.
    • Contains glycerides
      Mono and diglycerides are commonly used in processed foods to maintain stability in liquid products and "improve" quality in baked goods. These glycerides could be created using both hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils or animal fats. In theory, this may transfer a small amount of trans fats into the product. The glycerides are synthesized into phosphates by reacting with phosphorus pentoxide, a potential environmental hazard. But that's only part of the problem . . . The presence of mono and diglycerides should discourage you from buying a product for more than just these reasons: their inclusion in a product indicates that it is industrially processed. Choose products without mono and diglycerides not only for health reasons, but because you are getting a better quality food item overall.
    • Duck feathers & human hair in here?
      L-cysteine, found in this product, is an additive made from duck feathers or human hair. It is used as a dough conditioner and to extend shelf life. There are synthetic versions made from non-animal parts - these are more expensive, but well worth it for consumers who do not want duck feathers or human hair in their food. Check the label. Or better yet, avoid this needless additive. Choose fresh baked breads that use natural preservatives, if any at all. If you have a problem with bread spoilage, freeze your bread and toast or thaw to reheat.


    Fish Allergy, Eggs Allergy, Gluten Allergy, Wheat Allergy, Soy Allergy

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    New england cod fish cakes Ingredients

    Cod, Potatoes, Eggs, Onions, Parsley. Bread Crumbs: Wheat Flour (Contains Iron, Niacin, Thiamin, Riboflavin, and Folic Acid), Water, Vegetable Shortening (Soybean, Cottonseed and/or Canola Oils), Dextrose, Yeast, Salt, Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Mono and Diglycerides, Dough Conditioners (Calcium Sulfate, Ascorbic Acid, L-Cysteine, Fungal Enzyme, Azodicarbonamide), and Spices.

    % RDI of Main Nutrition Facts

    of RDI* (70 calories) 85 g
    • Cal: 3.5 %
    • Fat: 1.5 %
    • Carb: 3 %
    • Prot: 10 %
    • 0%
      RDI norm*

    Calories Breakdown

    • Carbs (55.4%)
    • Fat (13.8%)
    • Protein (30.8%)
    Yankee Trader Seafood New england cod fish cakes Good and Bad Points
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