Calories in Bug Juice Juice fruity punch

How many calories should you eat?

Nutrition Facts Bug Juice Juice fruity punch

Amount Per 8 oz
Calories 114 Kcal (477 kJ)
Calories from fat 0 Kcal
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Sodium 7mg 0%
Total Carbs 30g 10%
Sugars 29g 116%
Vitamin C 75mg 125%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Find out how many calories should you eat.

Ingredients And Nutrition Overview

  • WeightWatchers Points: 2.3, PointsPlus: 3, SmartPoints: 7
    WeightWatchers Points are estimated by carbohydrates, fats, protein and fiber in product. They are not an affirmation of better quality or nutritional value of the product or its manufacturer. Only way to count for dieters. Less points are better.
    Read more at Weight watchers diet review
  • Convert Salt tsps to Sodium mg easily
    Salt (NaCl) is not excactly sodium (Na).
    It is not right to use these terms as synonyms.
    The FDA recommended limit of sodium is 2,300 mg per day (or even less - about 1500 mg while one is on low sodium diets).
    This is much less than the weight of salt.
    (5,750 mg per day or 3,750 mg for low sodium diet) and not so convenient to calculate.
    Know how much sodium is in your salt - without a calculator:
    1/4 tsp salt = 600 mg sodium
    1/2 tsp salt = 1200 mg sodium
    3/4 tsp salt = 1800 mg sodium
    1 tsp salt = 2300 mg sodium
  • 12 tsp of sugars per serving
    This volume includes both naturally occurring from ingredients and specially added sugars.
    USDA tells us that last years each American consumed an average 130 pounds of caloric sweeteners per year!
    That works out to 30 tsp of sugars per day approximately 480 extra calories!
    Just to think: Eating just 200 more calories daily than your body requires for body functioning and exercise leads to a 20-pound weight gain in a year.
  • Naturally high in Vitamin C
    You get real, natural easy absorbing Vitamin C from this product, not as a artificial fortified ingredient.
    This is great! Let's try to get the best from the real food, because we get too much from artificial ingredients nowdays.
  • Contains controversial artificial colors
    Once upon a time, there were no food colorings. Then folks figured out that food looks better and sells more when it can be enlivened through dyes. For most of food history, the dyes were from natural sources – beet juice for red, turmeric for yellow,etc… However, in the quest to increase color intensity and lower manufacturing costs, cheap artificial dyes were introduced to market. Unfortunately they pose a risk for hyperactivity in children, cancer, and allergic reactions. ----------- Sources: Feingold BF. Hyperkinesis and learning disabilities linked to artificial food flavors and colors. Am J Nurs 1975; 75-5: 797-803. Harley JP, Matthews CG, Eichman P. Synthetic Food Colors and Hyperactivity in Children: A double-blind challenge experiment. Pediatrics 1978; 62: 975-983. Kobylewski S, Jacobson M. Toxicology of food dyes. Int J Occup Env Heal 2012; 18-3: 220-246. McCann D, Barrett A, Cooper A, Crumpler D, Dalen L, Grimshaw K, Kitchin E, Lok K, Porteous L, Prince E, Sonuga-Garke E, OWarner J, Stevenson J. Food additives and hyperactive behavior in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2007; 370: 1560-67. Schab DW, Trinh NT. Do artificial food colors promote hyperactivity in children with hyperactive syndromes? A meta-analysis of double-blind placebo-controlled trials. J Dev Behav Pediatr 2004; 25: 423-434. Sonuga-Barke EJS, Hollis C, Brandeis D, Konofal E, Cortese S, Lecendreux M, Daley D, Wong I, Ferrin M, Sergeant J, Holtmann M, Stevenson J, Danckaerts M, Van Der Oord S, Dopfner M, Dittmann R, Simonoff E, Zuddas A, Banaschewski T, Buitelaar J, Coghill D. Nonharmacological interventions for ADHA: Systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials of dietary and psychological treatments. Am J Psychiatry 2013; 170-3: 275-289. Stevens LJ, Kuczek T, Burgess JR, Hurt E, Arnold LE. Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: Thirty-five years of research. Clin Pediatr 2011; 50:279-293. Williams JI, Cram DM, Tausig FT, Webster E. Relative effects of drugs and diet on hyperactive behaviors: An experimental study. Pediatrics 1978; 61-6: 811-817.
  • Contains sodium benzoate / benzoic acid
    Sodium benzoate / benzoic acid are used to prevent the growth of microorganisms in acidic foods. They are natural substances. However, in beverages with ascorbic acid (vitamin C), a chemical reaction creates small amount of benzene, a carcinogen. ----------- Sources: 1. Gardner LK, Lawrence GD. Benzene production from decarboxylation of benzoic acid in the presence of ascorbic acid and a transition-metal catalyst. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 1993;41(5):693–695 2. Bonaccorsi G, Perico A, Bavazzano P, et al. Benzene in soft drinks: a study in Florence (Italy). Igiene e sanita pubblica 2012;68(4):523-32. 3. Li L, Li H, Zhang X, Wang L, Xu L, Wang X, Yu Y, Zhang Y, Cao G. Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of benzene homologues in ambient air in the northeastern urban area of Beijing, China. Journal of Environmental Sciences 2014;26(1):214-23. · Focuses on benzene in the air vs. food. However, supports cancer risk from benzene exposure 4. Huff J. Benzene-induced cancers: abridged history and occupational health impact. International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2007;13(2):213-21. 5. Smith, MT. Advances in understanding benzene health effects and susceptibility. Annual Review of Public Health 2010;31:133-48 6. Nyman PJ, Diachenko GW, Perfetti GA, McNeal TP, Hiatt MH, Morehouse KM. Survey results of benzene in soft drinks and other beverages by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2008;56(2):571-6.
  • For dieters: FoodPoints value is 3
    * FoodPoints are calculated by Fooducate based on fats, carbs, fiber, and protein. They are not an endorsement or approval of the product or its manufacturer. The fewer points - the better.
  • Controversial additive TBHQ in here
    TBHQ (tertiary butylhydroquinone) is an antioxidant used to keep oils from going rancid. It is a petroleum derivative. Yummy. The food industry pushed the FDA for years to get it approved as a preservative despite the fact that ingestion of large doses (a thirtieth of an ounce) can cause nausea, delirium, and ringing of the ears. (Anyone remember what Jack Nicholson had for lunch in “The Shining”?) TBHQ cannot exceed 0.02% of the oil and fat content in a food.
  • Highly Processed!
    This product is highly processed. If you'll take a look at its ingredient list, you'll discover new words to add to your vocabulary. Many of theses ingredients are required to increase the shelf life of the product and improve the flavor that disappears when food is not fresh.
  • One of the worst products in its category
    This product is in the bottom 10% of the products in its category
  • Bad bromine in here
    BROMINATED VEGETABLE OIL is a key ingredient in artificially citrus-flavored drinks like Mountain Dew, Fresca, and some varieties of Gatorade. (But not in Europe, where it's been banned for years.) It serves two main functions — it is a stabilizer and also responsible for that slightly cloudy look these beverages have. In essence, take a vegetable oil, add some bromine atoms and — voilà, you now have brominated vegetable oil. For the record, liquid bromine — also found in photo paper, car seats, mattresses, and carpeting — is corrosive and extremely hazardous to our skin and lungs. So what’s the health risk? Well, bromine is fat-soluble and builds up in our tissues. A 16-ounce soft drink made with brominated vegetable oil contains approximately 2 milligrams of bromine. Find out what studies say about bromide on our blog . . . Choose drinks without brominated vegetable oil. There's no reason to consume something questionable when there are reasonable alternatives. For more information on why you should avoid brominated vegetable oil, follow the link to our blog.
  • Contains artificial flavors. Learn why
    Companies add artificial flavors to products to make them taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Artificial flavorings are cheaper to source than natural flavors and are perceived as "worse" than natural flavors. They are more stable (and usually less chemically complex) than natural flavors. Artificial flavors are not necessarily bad for you from a health perspective. however, people with food sensitivities or allergies may want to avoid artificial flavors if they are unnamed. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Natural flavors added. Learn why
    Companies add flavorings to make products taste better. They are created in a lab and the formulations are guarded as trade secrets. Flavorings can compensate for flavor loss during processing, substitute for ingredients, lower production costs and increase shelf stability. Natural flavorings are more expensive to source than artificial flavors, but tend to be better received by consumers. People sensitive to MSG, vegans, vegetarians and those with allergies should pay special attention to the phrase "natural flavorings" since glutamates, animal products or allergens may be the source of natural flavors. You can always contact the manufacturer for more information.
  • Learn about juice concentrate
    Juice from concentrate is a juice that had most of its water content removed for storage and transportation purposes (why spend money on cooling or transporting water?). Concentrated juice can be held for months in cooled warehouses. When ready to bottle the juice, manufacturers reconstitute it by adding the exact same amount of water that was removed.
  • Not 100% fruit juice. Learn more
    Any of the following terms indicates a juice blend containing between 10%-99% fruit juice (usually a small amount): juice beverage juice blend juice cocktail punch


Soy Allergy, Sesame Allergy

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Juice fruity punch Ingredients

Water, Citric Acid, Food Starch-Modified, Glyceryl Abietate, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Red 40, Sodium Citrate, Concentrated Grape Juice, Concentrated Pineapple Juice, Concentrated Orange Juice, Concentrated Lime Juice, Brominated Vegetable Oil, Vitamin C, Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate to Protect the Natural Flavors, TBHQ, Blue 1.

% RDI of Main Nutrition Facts

of RDI* (114 calories) 226.8 g
  • Cal: 5.7 %
  • Fat: 0 %
  • Carb: 10 %
  • Prot: 0 %
  • 0%
    RDI norm*

Calories Breakdown

  • Carbs (100%)
Bug Juice Juice fruity punch Good and Bad Points
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